BJRD-Manuscript-Guidelines

BHUTAN JOURNAL OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

AIMS AND SCOPE

Published bi-annually, number one in May and number two in November, by the Royal University of Bhutan, Bhutan Journal of Research and Development (BJRD) aims to advance research and scholarship in all fields of social, physical and biological science and humanities relevant to the Kingdom of Bhutan. It publishes a wide range of papers in English or Dzongkha including theoretical or empirical research, short communication (e.g. research notes and review articles), and book reviews which can inform policy and advance knowledge relevant to Bhutan. The journal aspires to publish high quality papers and follows a system of blind peer review. Its primary, but not exclusive, audience includes scholars, academicians, policy makers, graduate students, and others interested in research and scholarship relevant to Bhutan.

MANUSCRIPT GUIDELINES

Authors should submit manuscripts for BJRD according to the following procedures.

  1. Authors should follow the guidelines in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 6th Edition) as a primary reference.
  2. All manuscript submissions should be in a Word "doc" file or in a Word-compatible file with top, bottom, left and right margins set to one inch, and Times New Roman 12 point font.
  3. The manuscript must include:

3.1 The cover/title page with the manuscript title, author’s name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, email address, and telephone and fax numbers (on a page separate from the body of the article).

3.2 A biographical note in no more than 150 words (on a page separate from the main body of the article); and

3.3 The body of the article including an abstract of 150-200 words, the main text (in no more than 5000 words), tables (if any), and figures (if any); endnotes (if any), and a reference page.

  1. The Peer Review Process: To facilitate blind review, authors should not reveal their identity or any information identifying the author on any page of the manuscript except the cover/title page and ‘biographical note’ which will not be sent to the reviewers. The biographical information should be provided on the inside of the cover/title page. The Managing Editor will acknowledge receipt of a manuscript and send a copy of it to the editor(s) for the review process. Authors will be contacted after the review process.
  2. Manuscripts submitted to BJRD should not be currently under review by another Journal or have been made available in print (e.g. working paper series) or on the Internet.
  3. The manuscript should be sent as an e-mail attachment to the Managing Editor or the Production Editor of the journal at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
  4. Manuscripts should not exceed 5,000 words excluding the title page, abstracts, tables and figures, references, and biographical information (3.3 above).
  5. The abstract should be between 150 and 200 words (see also 3.3 above).
  6. All manuscripts should be submitted along with a short biographical note. The biographical note should not exceed 150 words (see also 3.2 above). E-mail addresses of the authors will be published with permission in the biographical note.
  7. Use of endnote and footnote is not encouraged. However, where use of endnotes is necessary for the article, effort should be to minimize their number. Endnotes should be placed at the end of the paper immediately before the List of References.
  8. Page numbers should be placed in the bottom right corner of all pages.
  9. The Editorial Board reserves the right to reject a manuscript without substantive reasons if it does not fulfil the manuscript guidelines.

CITATIONS WITHIN THE TEXT

Within the body of your paper, the critical pieces of information to cite are author(s), year of publication, and page numbers if direct quotes are used. See examples:

  1. If paraphrased within text:

Example:

In the 2006 bestselling ‘The World is Flat’, Friedman outlines ten forces that have affected globalization.

  1. If an author is cited in text:

Example:

Friedman (2006) outlines ten forces that have affected globalization.

 

  1. If an author is not cited in text:

Example:

There are ten forces that have affected globalization (Friedman, 2006).

  1. Whenever using direct quotes from another source, it is necessary to include author(s), year of publication, and page number.
  2. If the quote is less than 40 words (short quote), the quote may be listed in the regular text. Here is an example:

Example:

Friedman (2006, p. 50) believes “the world has been flattened by the convergence of ten major political events, innovations, and companies”.

  1. If the quote is 40 words or more in length (long quote), the whole quote should be indented five spaces. Quotation marks are not used with long quotes.

Example:

Friedman (2006) draws connections between two seemingly disparate events: November 9 (dismantling of the Berlin Wall) and September 11 (attack on the World Trade Center). He believes these two dates represent the two competing forms of imagination at work in the world today: the creative imagination of 11/9 and the destructive imagination of 9/11. One brought down a wall and opened the windows of the world. . . [the other] putting up new invisible and concrete walls among people (p. 543).

TABLES AND FIGURES

  1. A table or figure (graphic) should not exceed 35 picas (5 in) in width or 51 picas (8 in) in length.
  2. Each table or figure should bear an Arabic number and a complete title indicating accurately the contents of the table or figure.
  3. A reference to each table or figure should be made in the text. Define all measurement units and abbreviations in table notes.
  4. Word and WordPerfect tables are preferred.
  5. Use Times New Roman Font on all graphics.
  6. Graphics or photographs are considered figures.
  7. Electronically submitted graphic files must be saved as Windows-compatible graphic files (e.g., BIP, GIF, JPG).
  8. Source lines and notes should be included where necessary.

REFERENCE PAGE

The reference page provides the reader information on how to locate sources cited within the work. Only those works that are cited within the text should appear on the reference page (do not include works that you reviewed but did not cite in your work). Conversely, all the works cited in your work should appear on the reference page. Please follow the examples provided here.

  1. Articles in periodicals (journals, newspapers, or magazines)

Format:

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (year). Title of article. Title of periodical, volume (issue), pages.

Example:

Lick, D. W., & Smith, C. S. (200l). Leading change: Creating the future for education technology. Syllabus, 15(5), 22-24.

  1. Electronic (Online) Periodicals:

Format:

Author, A. A. (date of publication). Title of article Title of Journal, volume(number), page numbers. Retrieved month date, year, from http://web address 

Example:

Hackney, C. E., & Bock, M. (2000). Beyond mentoring: Toward an invitational academe. Advancing Women in Leadership, 3(1), 34-41. Retrieved August 20, 2001, from http://www.advancingwomen.com/awal/winter2000/hachney-bock.html 

  1. Book, edition:

General format:

Author, A. A. (year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher. Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle (number ed.). Location: Publisher.

Example:

DeVoss, J. A., & Andrews, M. F. (2006). School counselors as educational leaders. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. Doughtery, A. M. (2009). Psychological consultation and collaboration in school and community settings: Issues and stages (5th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Example (Government documents)

RGOB. (2010). Bhutan multiple indicator survey report. Thimphu: the National Statistical Bureau, Royal Government of Bhutan.

  1. Chapters in a book

General format:

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (date of publication). Title of chapter. In A. Editor (Ed.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher. 

Example:

James, J. E., & Smith, A. A. (1988). Two sides of paradise: The Eden myth according to Kirk and Spock. In D. Palumbo (Ed.), Spectrum of the fantastic (pp. 219-223). Westport, CT: Greenwood.

  1. Electronic (Website)

General format:

Author, A. A. (date of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume (issue), page numbers. Retrieved month date, year, from http://web address

Example:

Hackney, C. E., & Bock, M. (2000, Winter). Beyond mentoring: Toward an invitational academy. Advancing Women in Leadership, 3(1), 33-39. Retrieved August 20, 2001, from http://advancingwomen.com/awal/winter2000//hackney-bock.html.

  1. Personal communication (Interview, e-mail and other forms of personal communication)

No personal communication is included in the reference list. Instead, cite the communicator's name, the phrase "personal communication," and the date of the communication in the main text only.

Example:

(P. Choki, personal communication, January 4, 2010).

EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE:

Any inquiries related to BJRD, including manuscripts for submission, should be addressed to: Deki C Gyamtso Managing Editor at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Jamba Tobden, Production Editor at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ______________________________________________________

The Bhutan Journal of Research and Development Manuscript Guidelines were approved by the University Academic Board in its 25th meeting on 3 May 2012 at ILCS, Taktse (Trongsa).

© 2018 Royal University of Bhutan. All Rights Reserved.

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